Post-Op Instructions

Following Operative Dentistry

What To Expect

1. The tooth may be sensitive to cold temperatures for a few weeks. Much
of the insulating layer of the tooth was destroyed by decay and will be restored
in time by your tooth’s healing processes.

2. The area above the tooth (on the top jaw) or behind the last tooth (on
the bottom jaw) may be sore where the anesthetic needle punctured the
tissue. This puncture, combined with keeping your mouth open during
the procedure, may make your facial muscles, or the area in front of your
ears, sore for a few days.

3. The gum tissue around the tooth may be tender for a few days.

What To Do

1. If prescribed, take the proper pain medication. If no prescription was given, then take the same over the counter medicine you would take for a headache. If after 48 hours your discomfort is not being managed by your medication, please call the office.

2. Wait for the anesthesia (numbing) to wear off before attempting to eat.
While the tooth is ready for eating immediately, your lips and tongue may
be numb and susceptible to biting trauma.

3. Return to your normal brushing and flossing routine as soon as your body
and pain threshold allow.

Please Call Us If

1. Your bite feels “high” or if the tooth is hitting before the rest of your Teeth while chewing. Your tooth may require minor adjustment not detectable at the initial appointment when your tooth was restored.

2. Intense discomfort lasts more than 48 hours. (Minor discomfort will gradually diminish in time.)

3. You experience a sharp, shooting pain upon hard biting pressure. The tooth that was restored may have developed a crack and needs immediate attention.

Following Periodontal Procedures

What To Expect

1. Your teeth may have generalized temperature sensitivity for a few weeks. Tartar, plaque, and bacteria removed from the tooth had been “protecting”

the tooth from extreme temperatures prior to today’s visit. Prescription fluoride will reduce some of this sensitivity.

2. Your gums around the teeth, as well as some of your facial muscles may

be tender for a few days.

3. Inflamed and swollen gums will begin to firm up and become pink. Your mouth will feel cleaner, and your breath will smell better. These are positive symptoms that can be sustained by routine brushing and flossing.

What To Do

1. If prescribed, take the proper pain medication. If no prescription was given, then take the same over the counter medicine you would take for a headache. If after 48 hours your discomfort is not being managed by medication, please call the office.

2. Wait for the anesthesia (numbing) to wear off before attempting to eat. While your teeth are ready for eating immediately, your lips and tongue may be numb for a while and susceptible to biting trauma.

3. If prescribed, take the proper antibiotic, mouthrinse, or toothpaste as directed.

4. Resume good brushing technique and routines as soon as your body and pain threshold allows. To maintain the benefits of your gum therapy, proper homecare is essential. Maintenance visits in our office are intended to monitor your disease progression, they are not a substitute for proper homecare. Since you have already made a substantial investment of time and money to initiate gum disease therapy, it is wise to maintain and improve upon the positive results already obtained.

Please Call Us If

Intense discomfort lasts more than 48 hours.

Following Fixed Prosthetic Restoration

What To Expect

1. The tooth may be very tender the initial 48 hours after your appointment. Slight discomfort/sensitivity to biting and cold temperatures is to be expected, initially. However, after 2 to 3 days, the tooth should settle down.

2. The area above the tooth (on the top jaw) or behind the last tooth (on the bottom jaw) may be sore where the anesthetic needle punctured the tissue. This puncture, combined with keeping your mouth open during the procedure, may make your facial muscles, or area in front of your ears, sore for a few days.

3. The gum tissue around the tooth may be tender for a few days.

4. While your provisional, or temporary restoration, was made to resemble your tooth before it was restored, its contours and smoothness may take a couple of days for your tongue to get accustomed to.

What To Do

1. If prescribed, take the proper pain medication. If no prescription was given, then take the same over the counter medicine you would take for a headache. If after 48 hours your discomfort is not being managed by medication, please call the office.

2. Wait for the anesthesia (numbing) to wear off before attempting to eat. While the tooth is ready for eating immediately, your lips and tongue may

be numb for a while and susceptible to biting trauma.

3. Return to your normal brushing and flossing routine as soon as your body and pain threshold allow.

Please Call Us Immediately If

1. Your temporary restoration comes off or feels loose. Without the acrylic temporary, the tooth may change position and is prone to possible fracture.

2. The tooth develops sensitivity to hot temperatures, begins to ache at night, or throbs spontaneously. The nerve inside the tooth may be dying and may require therapy before the final restoration is cemented.

Extractions

What To Expect

1. A certain amount of pain is to be expected the first 24 hours following surgery.

2. Some bleeding may continue for up to a few hours following the tooth extraction.

3. Swelling of the face may occur over the area of the tooth that was removed. It should subside 48 hours after the procedure.

4. If the tooth was difficult to remove, small, sharp fragments of bone may loosen and work their way out through the gums.

What To Do

1. Bite securely on gauze for 30 minutes after surgery. If the socket is still bleeding after 30 minutes, resume biting pressure on a fresh piece of gauze for another 30 minutes, and refrain from talking.

2. Take the pain medication prescribed.

3. Place ice on your face if directed to do so: 10 minutes on, 10 minutes off for 2 to 3 hours. Swelling and restricted jaw movement is expected and will be the greatest on the second post-operative day.

4. Wait until the anesthesia (numbing) has worn off before eating or drinking. Drink plenty of fluids today. Do not use a straw. Do not drink extremely hot or cold liquids. Eat whatever you can comfortably tolerate. Start with soft foods.

5. If you smoke, refrain from smoking for the first 48 hours. Smokers have a higher incidence of “dry sockets.”

6. Brush your teeth gently today. Do not rinse your mouth out today. Begin rinsing your mouth after meals starting tomorrow and continuing each day until the stitches (if placed) are removed. Mix a half-teaspoon of salt in a tall glass of warm water, gently rinse, and let water fall out of your mouth. No vigorous swishing or spitting.

7. If you are presently on antibiotics, continue to take them until you have completed the entire prescription as directed by the doctor.

 Please call if you have any questions. This is the most important instruction!