Wisdom Teeth Extractions

Dental Health and the Extraction of Wisdom Teeth

Wisdom teeth are the third and final set of molars that most people get in their late teens or early twenties. Sometimes these teeth can be a valuable asset to the mouth when healthy and properly aligned, but more often, they are misaligned and require removal.

Poor alignment of wisdom teeth can crowd or damage adjacent teeth, the jawbone, or nerves. Wisdom teeth that lean toward the second molars make those teeth more vulnerable to decay by trapping plaque and food. In addition, wisdom teeth can be entrapped completely within soft tissue and/or the jawbone or only partially break through the gum tissue. Teeth that remain partially or completely entrapped are termed “impacted.” Partial eruption allows for an opening for bacteria to enter around the tooth and cause infection. Partially erupted teeth are also prone to tooth decay and gum disease because their location is hard to brush and floss.

We periodically evaluate your dental x-rays for the presence and alignment of wisdom teeth. The extraction of wisdom teeth is a surgical procedure that requires treatment by an oral surgeon.

Non-Surgical Extractions

The extraction of a tooth can be necessary for a number of reasons including severe decay and advanced periodontal disease. Teeth can also break in a way that cannot be restored. Often teeth that are poorly positioned are removed in preparation for orthodontic treatment. Most non-surgical extractions can be performed here in our office.

What is a Dry Socket?

A dry socket occurs when a blood clot fails to form in the socket where the tooth has been extracted or the clot has been dislodged causing a significant delay in healing time. Please follow our post op instructions to reduce the chances of developing a dry socket.